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how to fix a leaking kitchen faucet 1

how to fix a leaking kitchen faucet 1

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Repair a Leaky Two-Handled Faucet Learn how to repair three types of double-handle faucets: ceramic disc, compression/reverse-compression and cartridge. Keep in mind that some cartridge bodies and ceramic disc bodies/cylinders can look similar. In most cases, the cartridge body doesn't have moving parts. The ceramic disc body/cylinder does have moving parts that pivot to open the ports on the bottom. These instructions work for sink faucets in kitchens and bathrooms, as well as bathtubs and showers. Save Item Send to a FriendPrint Tools & Materials Tools Screwdrivers Slip-joint and Needle-Nose Pliers Adjustable and Hex Wrenches Materials Faucet Repair Parts Product costs, availability, and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Locate the Leak Determine which side of your faucet is leaking by shutting off the water supply valves one at a time. If the leak doesn’t stop after the first valve is turned off, it’s the other line that’s leaking. Once you determine which side is leaking, turn off both supply valves. If your valves are stuck, shut off the water main. You will have to replace hardware for both sides since you won’t be able to identify whether the hot or cold side is leaking. Disassemble the Old Faucet Step 1 Turn faucet handles to the “on” position to release any residual water. Close the drain and place a towel in the sink to protect the surface and catch any dropped parts. Step 2 Remove the aerator and inspect it for damage. If it’s stuck, soak a towel in vinegar and wrap it around the aerator to help loosen mineral deposits. After an hour, gently twist the aerator with a towel and pliers. Step 3 As you disassemble the old faucet, lay the parts in order on a flat surface and snap a picture for reference. Then, put those parts in a plastic bag and take them to the store with you when shopping. You may only require one part, but it may be best to buy a kit and replace everything, including a new aerator if yours is damaged. Ceramic Disc Faucets This type of faucet uses a cylinder with tiny discs on the bottom that control water flow. The most successful repair typically replaces the entire cylinder. Step 1 Loosen the set screw and remove the handle. Step 2 Unscrew the retainer nut or mounting screw and pull out the cylinder. Step 3 Set a new cylinder into place and reassemble the faucet. Step 4 With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Compression & Reverse-compression Faucets In this repair, you’ll replace the washer and O-ring or gasket on the valve stem, as well as the valve seat in the faucet. Step 1 Remove handles or knobs by prying off the temperature indicator cap and removing the screw. Pull the handles off the base. Some handles are removed by backing out a set screw. Step 2 Loosen the retaining screw with a wrench and take out the valve stem. Step 3 On the stem, remove the screw, washer and old O-ring. Step 4 Add plumber’s grease to the stem and install a new O-ring and washer. Replace the screw. Step 5 Remove the valve seat with a seat or hex wrench and insert a new one. Step 6 Reassemble your faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Cartridge Faucet Step 1 Unscrew the set screw to remove the handle. Remove the retaining clip or nut. Step 2 Gently pull out the cartridge and replace it with a new one Step 3 Reassemble the faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Good to KnowWhile you have the faucet disassembled, it's a good idea to replace the seats and springs below the cartridge. They're inexpensive and adding new ones should ensure your repair is complete. Aerator After reassembling your faucet, run the water for a few minutes to clear debris from the new parts. Replace the aerator. If your old aerator needs cleaning, soak it in white vinegar to remove buildup and deposits. Rinse it before installation. You May Also Like . . . Toilet Repairs How to Install a Kitchen Faucet Repair a Leaky Single-Handle Faucet Shop Lowe's Faucet Repair & Parts Kitchen & Bar Faucets Bathroom Faucets & Handles Related Articles & Guides Clear Clogged Drains Replace a Bathroom Faucet Plumbing Repair Glossary Lowe's Services Faucet Installation


Tools & Materials Tools Screwdrivers Slip-joint and Needle-Nose Pliers Adjustable and Hex Wrenches Materials Faucet Repair Parts Product costs, availability, and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Locate the Leak Determine which side of your faucet is leaking by shutting off the water supply valves one at a time. If the leak doesn’t stop after the first valve is turned off, it’s the other line that’s leaking. Once you determine which side is leaking, turn off both supply valves. If your valves are stuck, shut off the water main. You will have to replace hardware for both sides since you won’t be able to identify whether the hot or cold side is leaking. Disassemble the Old Faucet Step 1 Turn faucet handles to the “on” position to release any residual water. Close the drain and place a towel in the sink to protect the surface and catch any dropped parts. Step 2 Remove the aerator and inspect it for damage. If it’s stuck, soak a towel in vinegar and wrap it around the aerator to help loosen mineral deposits. After an hour, gently twist the aerator with a towel and pliers. Step 3 As you disassemble the old faucet, lay the parts in order on a flat surface and snap a picture for reference. Then, put those parts in a plastic bag and take them to the store with you when shopping. You may only require one part, but it may be best to buy a kit and replace everything, including a new aerator if yours is damaged. Ceramic Disc Faucets This type of faucet uses a cylinder with tiny discs on the bottom that control water flow. The most successful repair typically replaces the entire cylinder. Step 1 Loosen the set screw and remove the handle. Step 2 Unscrew the retainer nut or mounting screw and pull out the cylinder. Step 3 Set a new cylinder into place and reassemble the faucet. Step 4 With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Compression & Reverse-compression Faucets In this repair, you’ll replace the washer and O-ring or gasket on the valve stem, as well as the valve seat in the faucet. Step 1 Remove handles or knobs by prying off the temperature indicator cap and removing the screw. Pull the handles off the base. Some handles are removed by backing out a set screw. Step 2 Loosen the retaining screw with a wrench and take out the valve stem. Step 3 On the stem, remove the screw, washer and old O-ring. Step 4 Add plumber’s grease to the stem and install a new O-ring and washer. Replace the screw. Step 5 Remove the valve seat with a seat or hex wrench and insert a new one. Step 6 Reassemble your faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Cartridge Faucet Step 1 Unscrew the set screw to remove the handle. Remove the retaining clip or nut. Step 2 Gently pull out the cartridge and replace it with a new one Step 3 Reassemble the faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Good to KnowWhile you have the faucet disassembled, it's a good idea to replace the seats and springs below the cartridge. They're inexpensive and adding new ones should ensure your repair is complete. Aerator After reassembling your faucet, run the water for a few minutes to clear debris from the new parts. Replace the aerator. If your old aerator needs cleaning, soak it in white vinegar to remove buildup and deposits. Rinse it before installation.


In this video, This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey helps a homeowner repair her leaky kitchen faucet.   Steps: 1. Close the hot- and cold-water shutoff valves under the kitchen sink. 2. Place a rag over the sink drain to catch any dropped parts. 3. Use a pocketknife to pry off the small index cover from the side of the faucet to reveal the hex-head screw. 4. Loosen the screw with the hex-key wrench and pull off the faucet handle. 5. Use the spanner wrench that came with the faucet to loosen and remove top cap assembly. 6. Pull straight up to remove the stainless-steel ball from the faucet body. 7. Use a pocketknife to extract the rubber seats and springs from inside the faucet. 8. Slip a new spring and rubber seat onto the tip of a pencil and lower it down into the faucet. Repeat to install the remaining seat and spring. 9. Reinstall the stainless-steel ball, making sure to align its keyway with the corresponding tab inside the faucet body. 10. On top of the stainless-steel ball install a new rubber gasket and cam cap. Align the keyway on the cap with the corresponding slot to ensure proper alignment. 11. Hand-tighten the top cap assembly back onto the faucet. 12. Open the two shutoff valves under the sink. 13. Use the spanner wrench to tighten the nut to provide the proper tension against the stainless-steel ball. 14. Reinstall the faucet handle, tighten the hex-head screw and then press on the index cover. 15. If your faucet doesn't have a stainless-steel ball, it's likely a ceramic-cartridge faucet. To repair the leak, simply remove the handle, pull out the ceramic cartridge and replace it with a new cartridge.